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Meet the Survivors Circle

Residential school Survivors gave Indigenous and non-Indigenous people the opportunity to begin this journey: The gift of reconciliation. It was Survivors that demanded government and church entities to be held responsible and held accountable for their actions. They also called for the creation of the Truth and Reconciliation Commission of Canada (TRC). Survivors continue to be the foundation of truth and reconciliation work in this country.

The Survivors Circle guides the National Centre guides the National Centre for Truth and Reconciliation (NCTR). These members:

  • Ensure that Survivors’ voices and perspectives remain central to NCTR programs and policies
  • Provide guidance and advice to the NCTR, the Governing Circle, the University of Manitoba and partners on anything important to the broader Survivor community.

Read more about the NCTR Survivors Circle

“I had great pleasure serving on the first Survivors Circle of the NCTR. It is important to have the Survivor voice in the development and decision making of the Centre. This will ensure inclusivity, balance and truth in the reflection of “our legacy” for future generations.” ~ Terri Brown, Survivor and the Chair of the NCTR founding Survivors Circle

Eugene Arcand

A Cree from the Muskeg Lake First Nation in Saskatchewan, Eugene Arcand spent nine years at the St. Michael Indian…

A Cree from the Muskeg Lake First Nation in Saskatchewan, Eugene Arcand spent nine years at the St. Michael Indian Residential School in Duck Lake and two years at the St. Paul’s Lebret Students Residence, both in Saskatchewan. First Nation Sports Hall of Fame inductee, Mr. Arcand has dedicated much of his time to organizing regional and national events – First Nations sports events, cultural events, tourism events, and events geared to the advancement of First Nations youth.

Over the past few years, through the Indian Residential Schools Survivor Committee at the TRC and the NCTR Governing Circle, Eugene has worked to ensure that both the public and Survivor communities are kept informed of the developments and processes associated with the Indian Residential School Settlement Agreement. Eugene was successful because of the support and love of his family and wife Lorna Arcand, who he has been married to for 48 years.Together, they raised three children, seven grandchildren and three chapan.

 

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Garnet Angeconeb

Garnet is Anishinaabe originally from the traditional territory of the Lac Seul First Nation. He left there to attend Pelican Indian…

Garnet is Anishinaabe originally from the traditional territory of the Lac Seul First Nation. He left there to attend Pelican Indian Residential School near Sioux Lookout, ON from 1963 to 1969. He graduated from the School of Journalism at the University of Western Ontario in London, ON. Garnet worked for many years at Wawatay Native Communications Society in northern Ontario. He also worked at CBC Thunder Bay.

 

Garnet has been a strong supporter for residential school survivors at the national, regional and local levels. He was a board member of the Aboriginal Healing Foundation.

 

He has worked to bridge relations and is an advocate for reconciliation between Canada and Indigenous people. In 2012 he was made a member of the Order of Canada. He is also a recipient of the 2002 Queen’s Golden Jubilee medal and the 2012 Queen’s Diamond Jubilee medal.

 

 

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Maata Evaluardjuk-Palmer

Maata Evaluardjuk-Palmer is one of the last generation of Elders born and raised out on the traditional lands of the…

Maata Evaluardjuk-Palmer is one of the last generation of Elders born and raised out on the traditional lands of the Inuit. During her youth Maata survived in a natural environment with her family before they were relocated to Frobisher Bay, Nunavut by the Government of Canada. This resulted in a culture shock as many families were removed from their traditional lifestyles and placed into a settled Canadian styled community. As a child Maata attended the Apex Federal Day School from 1960 to 1967, then attended Churchill Vocational School from 1967 to 1968 and went on to Keewatin Community College for Office Management.

Maata has sat on many boards such as the YMCA, the Mid-Wifery Training Program, the Manitoba Inuit Association Band, Inuit Health Research Committee, and the National Centre for Truth and Reconciliation’s Survivors Circle. Maata is a grandmother and great-grandmother who enjoys being involved in community events and educational programming whenever she can.

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Barbara Cameron

Barb Cameron’s spirit names are “Neegaunibinessikwe” meaning “Female Leader of the Thunderbirds” and “Begonegeezhig” meaning “Hole in the Sky”. Barb…

Barb Cameron’s spirit names are “Neegaunibinessikwe” meaning “Female Leader of the Thunderbirds” and “Begonegeezhig” meaning “Hole in the Sky”. Barb belongs to the Wolf Clan and is Midewiwin Shkabehikwe to Minweyweywigaan Midewiwin Lodge in Roseau River, Manitoba. She is active in reconnecting, learning, assisting, and maintaining the Traditional Knowledges and the practices of Midewiwin ceremonial teachings at the Lodge.

Barb is a member of Long Plain First Nation, a well-respected Knowledge Keeper, and is a second-generation Indian residential school Survivor. She remains to be a fluent Anishinabemowin speaker despite the challenges faced during Barb’s attendance at the Brandon Indian Residential School. 

Barb began work as a Court Interpreter in the Manitoba Provincial Court System under the tutelage of Angus Merrick. Later in her career, she played an essential role as an interpreter and statement gatherer on behalf of residential school Survivors during the Truth and Reconciliation Commission’s national hearings. Aside from being a Survivors Circle member, Barb is a Crisis Counsellor and Mental Health Therapist for remote Indigenous Communities. She continues to work with Indigenous communities as a Knowledge Keeper by restoring connections with their Spirits and their way of life as given to us from the Creator. 

“I recognize and take responsibility for my own unintentional modelling of my own trauma to my children, and grandchildren, who continue to be impacted today, and into the future.  I hope in doing so, this will stop the destruction of our families.  The first reconciliation needs to start with myself. I hope that this provides you with a glimpse of who my Spirit is. Miigwetch”

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Laurie McDonald

Laurie is a new member of the Survivors Circle and is a First Nations 2Spirit Survivor who attended Ermineskin Residential School.…

Laurie is a new member of the Survivors Circle and is a First Nations 2Spirit Survivor who attended Ermineskin Residential School. They are a 2Spirit leader who co-founded the Greater Vancouver Native Cultural Society in 1978. This is a support organization for 2Spirit/Indigenous LGBTQ2S People living in Vancouver and British Columbia.

Laurie is a strong 2Spirit leader who educated the public about the unique experiences of 2Spirit Peoples in residential school.

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Phyllis Webstad

Phyllis Webstad is Northern Secwpemc (Shuswap) from the Stswecem’c Xgat’tem First Nation (Canoe Creek Indian Band). She comes from mixed…

Phyllis Webstad is Northern Secwpemc (Shuswap) from the Stswecem’c Xgat’tem First Nation (Canoe Creek Indian Band). She comes from mixed Secwepemc and Irish/French heritage, was born in Dog Creek, and lives in Williams Lake, BC. Today, Phyllis is married, has one son, a step-son and five grandchildren. She is the Executive Director of the Orange Shirt Society, and tours the country telling her story and raising awareness about the impacts of the residential school system. She has now published two books, the “Orange Shirt Story” and “Phyllis’s Orange Shirt” for younger children.

She earned diplomas in Business Administration from the Nicola Valley Institute of Technology; and in Accounting from Thompson Rivers University. Phyllis received the 2017 TRU Distinguished Alumni Award for her unprecedented impact on local, provincial, national and international communities through the sharing of her orange shirt story.

 

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Navalik Tologanak

Navalik Tologanak is from Cambridge Bay, Nunavut, and is a proud Inuinnaq who celebrates her heritage and traditions. She is…

Navalik Tologanak is from Cambridge Bay, Nunavut, and is a proud Inuinnaq who celebrates her heritage and traditions. She is an experience journalist who began her career in 1995, writing for Nunavut News and continues to this day. She was a natural born storyteller and writer. She writes in Inuinnaqtut about community events, hunting caribou, fishing, how to make a pair of kamiks, parkas, mitts, life in Cambridge Bay, especially anything connected to culture. She was an Inuit/ Inuk board member for 13 years with the Aboriginal Healing Foundation.

Navalik was a cultural advisor to legal firms to assist with residential schools’ compensation packages, programs, and funding. She is also a cultural interpreter for cruise ship companies where she tells stories about the Inuit and her homeland Nunavut. She is also a cultural advisor to the Arctic Research Foundation.

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Susan Beaudin

Susan has worked in education for over 30 years and gained a Master of Education from the University of Regina.…

Susan has worked in education for over 30 years and gained a Master of Education from the University of Regina. A large part of her current work is to decolonize education policies, so they reflect First Nations languages, cultures, and history.

Susan is passionate and promises to work diligently on behalf of all Survivors. She also serves as co-chair of the Truth and Reconciliation Committee of the Archdiocese of Regina.

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Edna Elias

Edna Elias was called by her grandmother, “Haattuliarmiutaq”, meaning “a person from thin ice” because she was born on a…

Edna Elias was called by her grandmother, “Haattuliarmiutaq”, meaning “a person from thin ice” because she was born on a fishing lake in the fall. Thus the reason why she loves ice fishing in the fall and spring.

A teacher by profession, Edna is an Inuit language and cultural advocate. She has lived and breathed her culture in an urban setting; showcasing it where and when she can at Edmonton events. She shares her cultural knowledge through presentations at educational institutions and elementary schools in and around the city. Teaching Inuinnaqtun, the dialect of the Copper Inuit of western Kitikmeot in Nunavut is another passion to train adults, language teachers, staff of pre-school and daycare programs, educators  and parents of small children.

After five years as Commissioner of Nunavut, Edna had returned to her home community of Qurluqtuq, Nunavut, the most westerly community in Nunavut. Since her return home, she was heavily involved in her community; initiated a not for profit greenhouse society, opened her home to women to learn traditional sewing and fur preparation and is one of the Ayauqtiit (Guidance) members whose sole purpose is to give advice to the two schools. Volunteering continued to be a pastime. Most recently she and two former educators had opened a business to promote the preservation and retention of Inuinnaqtun through language courses, provision of educational and cultural orientation and advice, program and event planning, production of Inuinnaqtun reading material and to support the language programming in the schools.

All of the above changed and stopped quickly for Edna when an illness affected her performance and forced her to relocate to Edmonton where she could access better medical care and services. “I am happy to say that I have learned to live within my new limits and do NOT let my illness control my life,” says Edna.

Currently residing in Edmonton, Edna has been actively involved in a number of Indigenous Advisory Circles as a voice for Inuit. As of late, she joined the Grant MacEwen University Indigenous Advisory Council, the Royal Alberta Museum Indigenous Advisory Council, the Edmonton International Elders & Knowledge Keepers Circle on the project, Indigenous Spaces, the Indigenous Advisory Council for the City of Edmonton and the Indigenous Advisory Council on the project, Towards Home  (curbing homelessness).

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Brian Normand

Brian Normand is a Metis/Michif descendant from the Red River Settlement and a product from the Residential School System. Married…

Brian Normand is a Metis/Michif descendant from the Red River Settlement and a product from the Residential School System. Married to a proud Metis Woman (Claudette) for 45 years, together they have 3 proud Metis daughters and one son who passed on to the spirit world. He also has 7 grandchildren who keep him very busy.

Altogether he has worked as a spiritual caregiver/elder for the past 20+ years in the justice system (Agassiz Youth Center, Marymound Treatment Center, Stony Mountain Correctional Facility, Metis Child and Family Services, Native Clans, and Native Women’s Transition Center) providing culturally relevant care and therapy to Metis, First Nations and Inuit children, youth, and families. He previously was a member of the board at Metis Child Family Services and Indian and Metis Friendship Center.

During his tenure with organizations he has participated, developed, implemented, and delivered mandatory Aboriginal Awareness Training in addition to building a comprehensive cultural program for individuals involved in the Manitoba Justice System and Child Welfare System. He represented our Metis people at the Aboriginal Justice Inquiry.

He was also one of the 71 selected leaders of the world who went on a pilgrimage in Ange, France for collaborative leadership promoting Metis culture, heritage and spirituality.

As well under the mentorship of nationally recognized Grandmother and Elder Gladys Cook, He practiced in conducting the spectrum of Aboriginal ceremonies including Healing and Sharing circles and Longhouse ceremonies.

Throughout time he has built strong partnerships with non-Aboriginal and Aboriginal organizations for the betterment of our people. He was also nominated for the Manitoba Excellence Award in 2002.

Brian Normand has overcome many challenges in his lifetime, from being a residential school Survivor, to the recent loss of his wife, which has not dulled his spirit and zest for life. Brian continues to move forward, and models this for others.

 

 

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Survivors posing for photo by Bentwood Box

Previous Survivor Circle Members

Meet the 2017 – 2019 Survivors Circle

Meet the 2019 – 2021 Survivors Circle

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NCTR’s spirit name – bezhig miigwan, meaning “one feather”.

Bezhig miigwan calls upon us to see each Survivor coming to the NCTR as a single eagle feather and to show those Survivors the same respect and attention an eagle feather deserves. It also teaches we are all in this together — we are all one, connected, and it is vital to work together to achieve reconciliation.