Company Logo

Schedule for Truth and Reconciliation Week (Educators)

The following schedule is for Educators who have registered for the Truth and Reconciliation Week event. The schedule is subject to change in the weeks leading up to September 27.

If you have registered as a member of the General Public, please click here for the General Public schedule.

Truth and Reconciliation Week Educator Webinar – How to use Hubilo and what to expect.

Truth and Reconciliation Week Schedule for Educators

Click the following links to take you to the event schedule for a specific day.

Day 1 – Treaties, Land Claims and Unceded Territories.

11:30 AM ET – Welcome and Introduction from the NCTR
Concurrent Sessions follow:
Session (45 Minutes)Speaker
Session 1TBCAlanis O’Bomsawin
Session 2We Are All Treaty PeopleDr. Elder Harry Bone and Commissioner Loretta Ross
Session 3WAMPUM TALK: We Are All Treaty PeopleTeyotsihstokwáthe Dakota Brant
Session 4Peace and Friendship Treaties, Atlantic CanadaPaul Prosper, AFN Regional Chief, Nova Scotia/Newfoundland
Session 5Protecting our Nibi (Water)Autumn Peltier
Healing Supports are available throughout the sessions

Back to top

1:00 PM ET Concurrent Sessions
Session (45 Minutes)Speaker
Session 1TBC (French)Wapikoni/Télé-Québec
Session 2TBCRy Moran
Session 3TBCTBC
Session 4TBCTBC
Session 5Understanding Modern Treaties in BC: Sharing reconciliation journey stories and honouring our promisesChief Commissioner Celeste Haldane and Dr. Gwendolyn Point
Healing Supports are available throughout the sessions

Back to top

Paul Prosper

AFN Regional Chief, Nova Scotia/Newfoundland

Paul Prosper is Regional Chief for the Assembly of First Nations and represents the Mi’kmaw Chiefs of Nova Scotia and…

Paul Prosper is Regional Chief for the Assembly of First Nations and represents the Mi’kmaw Chiefs of Nova Scotia and Newfoundland. Prior to his appointment in 2020, he served as Chief of Paqtnkek Mi’kmaw Nation from 2013 to 2020. Paul is a proud graduate of the IB&M Initiative at the Schulich School of Law, Dalhousie University.

Paul has extensive experience in Aboriginal legal issues from a research, litigation, and negotiation perspective. His work has been primarily devoted to advocating for the rights of Mi’kmaw people. Through the years, Paul has worked for several Mi’kmaw organizations in such areas as oral history; Mi’kmaw land use and occupation studies; claims research; citizenship; consultation; First Nations governance; justice; community development; and Nationhood.

As an educator, Paul has taught courses for Cape Breton University including Mi’kmaw history, Aboriginal and Treaty Rights, and Mi’kmaw Governance. He has also served on numerous boards and committees with an aim to improving the lives of Mi’kmaw people. Paul has conducted numerous talks and presentations in academic, government, and First Nations institutional settings. He believes in building strong and resilient communities by enabling and empowering its members.

Read More… Read Less…

Dr. Elder Harry Bone, Chairperson, Elders Council

Treaty Relations Commission of Manitoba

Dr. Elder Harry Bone B.A. (Hons.), LL.D./13 (U of M), C. M., is a Treaty 2 Elder from Keeseekoowenin Ojibway Nation.…

Dr. Elder Harry Bone B.A. (Hons.), LL.D./13 (U of M), C. M., is a Treaty 2 Elder from Keeseekoowenin Ojibway Nation. Dr. Elder Bone was raised by his grandparents, who taught him the importance of maintaining ties to language, land, and culture. Their influence and teachings helped him to become a strong supporter of First Nations rights throughout his life.

 

He has an honours degree from Brandon University and also completed graduate studies in political studies at the University of Manitoba. While pursuing his Master of Arts degree, he was also a student advisor and lecturer for the university. Upon completion of his studies, he served as Director of the Manitoba Indian Education Authority, Director of Native Programs for the Federal Government, and Vice-President of Aboriginal Cultural Centres of Canada. He went on to become Chief and Director of Education for his community, CEO of the West Region Tribal Council. Due to his extensive knowledge of First Nations governance, he has led delegation meetings with all levels of government.

 

Dr. Elder Harry Bone’s achievements in leadership, scholarship, and public service have been recognized by the countless individuals, organizations, and communities that have been touched by his work. He was awarded an Honorary Doctor of Laws degree from the University of Manitoba for his trendsetting contributions that continue to advance Indigenous education in Canada today. He is also a recipient of Canada’s highest civilian honour, the Order of Canada, in recognition of “his contributions in advancing Indigenous education, preserving traditional laws, and for creating bridges between Indigenous and non-Indigenous people and communities.”

In addition to his years of advocacy and efforts to foster greater understanding of Anishinaabe perspectives, Dr. Elder Harry Bone is co-author of the following books: The Journey of the Spirit of the Red Man: A Message from the Elders (2012); Untuwe Pi Kin He (Who We are): Treaty Elders’ Teachings (2014); and Wahbanung – The Resurgence of Our People: Clearing the Path for Our Survival (2021).

 

Dr. Elder Harry Bone is currently the chair of the Council of Elders for the Assembly of Manitoba Chiefs and the Treaty Relations Commission of Manitoba. He maintains a close relationship with the Treaty Relations Commission of Manitoba as a special advisor and is involved in many of their initiatives such as Treaty Education and the Speakers Bureau. He is also an Elder in residence at the National Centre for Truth and Reconciliation, a member of the Turtle Lodge, and a member of the National Elders Council of the Turtle Lodge.

Read More… Read Less…

Treaty Commissioner Loretta Ross

Treaty Relations Commission of Manitoba

Loretta Ross (Bimaashi Migizi) is a member of the Hollow Water First Nation in Manitoba. Loretta obtained her law degree…

Loretta Ross (Bimaashi Migizi) is a member of the Hollow Water First Nation in Manitoba. Loretta obtained her law degree from Queen’s University and has been a practicing lawyer for over 20 years providing legal counsel to numerous First Nation people, governments and organizations, including the Assembly of Manitoba Chiefs and Assembly of First Nations.  Over the years, Loretta has served as counsel for First Nations on child and family matters, residential school claims and land issues including specific claims, Treaty land entitlement, trusts and Hydro development.

Loretta’s grandfather, George Barker, who served for 44 years as Chief of Hollow Water, taught her from an early age that, as a First Nation person, she would always carry the responsibility of advocating and educating on behalf of First Nation people. This is a responsibility that Loretta fully embraces. Loretta is also a big believer in family and community and therefore strives to find balance between her work and family which includes her husband, four children and her young grandchildren. Loretta loves to curl, golf and watch her children participate in their extra-curricular activities in her spare time.

Read More… Read Less…

Dakota Brant

Teyotsihstokwáthe Dakota Brant is a Mohawk Nation Tekarihoken clan woman from Six Nations of the Grand River Territory. She is…

Teyotsihstokwáthe Dakota Brant is a Mohawk Nation Tekarihoken clan woman from Six Nations of the Grand River Territory. She is an artist, entrepreneur, consultant and has travelled across North America and Europe speaking on culture, community, history and Indigenous affairs. She has a Master’s degree in Community Planning, is an Indspire Laureate, carried the title of Miss Indian World 2010, and was named a recipient of the 2020 Atlohsa Peace Award for efforts in the spirit of Truth & Reconciliation. At home in the village of Ohswé:ken, she is a volunteer firefighter with the Six Nations Fire & Emergency Services and employs many community members with her wholesale jewellery manufacturing company “Sapling & Flint”. Find her on instagram @TeyoDakotaBrant or her website www.dakotabrant.com

Read More… Read Less…

Celeste Haldane

Chief Commissioner, BC Treaty Commission

Celeste Haldane is Chief Commissioner of the British Columbia Treaty Commission. She was appointed in April 2017 and is serving…

Celeste Haldane is Chief Commissioner of the British Columbia Treaty Commission. She was appointed in April 2017 and is serving her second term. Celeste is proud to be from both the Sparrow family from Musqueam (Coast Salish) and the Haldane family from Metlakatla (Tsimshian).

Celeste is a practising lawyer and was appointed Queen’s Counsel in 2019. Drawing from over 25 years of experience, her specializations are in Indigenous law, corporate governance, and she previously practiced criminal defense and civil litigation. She is an active member of both the Indigenous Bar Association and the Canadian Bar Association where she is currently serving on the CBA Indigenous Advisory Group.

She holds a Master of Laws in Constitutional Law from Osgoode Hall Law School at York University, and a Bachelor of Laws and Bachelor of Arts majoring in Anthropology both from the University of British Columbia (UBC). She is also currently pursuing her doctorate in Anthropology and Law at UBC.

Celeste is passionate about social justice, promoting equity, giving back, and is devoted to animal welfare and helps rehome animals in need. These values provide the foundation for her career, academic pursuits, and how she gives back through volunteering.

Celeste also serves on governance boards and is currently a Director of the Brain Canada Foundation and Legal Aid BC. Previously, she served on the Hamber Foundation, UBC Board of Governors, the Musqueam Capital Corporation, and the Indigenous Bar Association, and is an alumna of the Governor General’s Canadian Leadership Conference. Celeste lives with her husband on Vancouver Island and is the proud mother of three, and grandmother of two.

 

Read More… Read Less…

Back to top

Day 2 – Language and Culture

11:30 AM ET – Welcome and Introduction from the NCTR
Concurrent Sessions follow:
Session (45 Minutes)Speaker
Session 1Métis Beadwork and Sashes: traditional crafting (French)Julie Desrochers
Session 2Language, Music, Culture and Tomorrow’s PathEmma Stevens with Carter Chiasson
Session 3Music is MedicineShawnee Kish
Session 4The Red River Jig with modern dance to inspire youthIvan Flett Memorial Dancers
Session 5Tell your story, put pen to paperRachelle Poems George KWALTANAAT (ancestral name)
Healing Supports are available throughout the sessions

Back to top

1:00 PM ET Concurrent Sessions
Session (45 Minutes)Speaker
Session 1TBCWapikoni/Télé-Québec (Métis)
Session 2Diversity from a Queer PerspectiveHost Adeline Bird, Filmmaker panel: Ryan Cooper and Sonya Ballantyne
Session 3The Sacredness of First Nation LanguagesClaudette Commanda
Session 4Twice ColonizedAaju Peter
Session 5Drum Teachings from a “Northern Cree” PerspectiveSteve Wood
Healing Supports are available throughout the sessions

Back to top

Emma Stevens

Eighteen-year-old Emma Stevens from Eskasoni First Nation (NS) has become a music sensation all before graduating high school. With the…

Eighteen-year-old Emma Stevens from Eskasoni First Nation (NS) has become a music sensation all before graduating high school. With the release of Steven’s debut song “My Unama’ki,” in 2018, her musical journey was just beginning. “My Unama’ki,” a celebration of the strength and resiliency of Mi’kmaq culture in Cape Breton has become Steven’s signature song and is regularly a part of events across Cape Breton Island.

As an artist, Emma is passionate about bringing awareness to important issues facing First Nations people across Canada, including the loss of language and the staggering number of
missing and murdered Indigenous women and girls (MMIWG). In 2019, Emma recorded Paul
McCartney’s “Blackbird” in Mi’kmaq to help bring awareness to the United Nations’ observance
of the International Year of Indigenous Languages. Since its release, Steven’s version of “Blackbird” has garnered international attention and has helped bring awareness to various efforts being undertaken to revitalize endangered Indigenous languages around the world, notably so in Steven’s own Mi’kma’ki where there are fewer than 10,000 speakers of the Mi’kmaq language remaining.

Stevens has performed across Canada and internationally with
performances in Nairobi, Kenya, Abu Dhabi, Parliament Hill in Ottawa and the UAE for United Nations assemblies where she sang and spoke to leaders and policy-makers from around the
world.

On July 1st, 2021, Steven’s released “I Want to Rise”, a song written to help bring awareness to the more than 4000 missing and murdered First Nations women and girls from across Canada
and the many thousands more MMIW in the United States of America, and, as well, to help empower First Nations youth to rise above the many challenges they face being Indigenous
youth in Canada today.

Read More… Read Less…

Carter Chiasson

Educator, musician and producer, Carter Chiasson, is based in Cape Breton Island (NS), where, for the past 9 years he…

Educator, musician and producer, Carter Chiasson, is based in Cape Breton Island (NS), where, for the past 9 years he has taught high school music and technological arts in Eskasoni, First Nation, the largest Indigenous community in Eastern Canada.

As an educator, Carter is passionate about working with youth to create authentic and unique experiences and artworks. Carter regularly uses music and various technologies to help students engage with, share and celebrate their cultural identities as well as address local and systemic social issues.

Read More… Read Less…

Shawnee Kish

Shawnee Kish discovered music as medicine at a very early age. Born dreaming about being on stage and starting her…

Shawnee Kish discovered music as medicine at a very early age. Born dreaming about being on stage and starting her journey toward a career in music at the age of 12, music has quickly become a source of self-empowerment for the Two Spirit soulful singer. Fuelling her with purpose and reason, making music has allowed Shawnee to stand tall in her personal strength and power. Named the winner of CBC’s 2020 Searchlight talent competition, this fierce, powerhouse artist has been celebrated as one of North America’s Top Gender Bending Artists (MTV), named by Billboard as an Artist You Need To Know and continuously uses her music to empower.

Listening to her chart-topping releases one can easily recognize that, as an artist, Shawnee has been influenced by the strong, confident voices of female performers such as Melissa Etheridge, Etta James, Nina Simone and Amy Whinehouse. Her deeply personal and always poignant lyrics are rooted in healing allowing both herself and her listeners to find purpose and reason in the stories she tells.

An outspoken advocate for her Indigenous and LGBTQ2+ communities, Shawnee is a proud Two Spirit Mohawk who has shared the stage with some of the world’s biggest names – Lady Gaga, Madonna and Alicia Keys to name a few. 2020 saw her step into the world of virtual performances without hesitation, taking part in The Canada House/UK Commerce International Women’s Day Virtual Performance, performing at The Songwriter Series with Serena Ryder and participating in the RBC’s Emerging Artist program. In addition to virtual performances, Shawnee raised her voice on a Grammy Museum Discussion Panel (Being an Artist During COVID) and joined the National Arts Centre of Canada on a collaborative youth project (ongoing).

2021 will see the Edmonton-based artist release a new EP that addresses her personal struggles of the past twelve months – “The main theme will be lighting up what used to be and getting on with what is now. The songs represent becoming yourself, finding out where you were was not where you wanted to be and fully embracing that in order to let go. Light the Place up, even if it’s unintentional” – and hopefully return to touring.

She will also continue her work with the We Matter Campaign and Kids Help Phone in hopes of empowering youth, providing strength and hope through music.

Read More… Read Less…

Aaju Peter

Born in Arkisserniaq, a northern Greenland community, in 1960 Aaju has lived up and down the west coast of her…

Born in Arkisserniaq, a northern Greenland community, in 1960 Aaju has lived up and down
the west coast of her native country as a result of her father’s teaching and preaching career.

At age eleven, Aaju left Greenland to attend school in Denmark where she learned to speak Danish and read
German, English, French and Latin. At age eighteen, she returned home to Greenland. In 1981, Aaju moved to Iqaluit, in Nunavut, Canada where she has taken up residence ever since. In Iqaluit Aaju
learned English and Inuktitut, which has helped her succeed in her work as an interpreter, and she has
done volunteer work with various women’s and interpretation organizations.

Her interests led her to the Arctic College where she took Inuit studies. She has travelled in Greenland, Europe and Canada performing lamp lighting ceremonies, traditional Inuit songs, displaying sealskin fashions. Currently Aaju has a home-based sealskin garment business, translates, collects traditional law from elders, raised her
five children, drove a dump-truck to build the breakwater in Iqaluit, has worked as a cultural guide in the tourism industry sailing to most communities in Greenland and arctic Canada.

Aaju is a graduate of the
Akitsiraq Law School (2005) and was called to the bar (2007). In recent years Aaju has been involved with documentaries such as Angry Inuk, Tunniit: Retracing the lines of Inuit tattoos, and Arctic
Defenders. These days Aaju is advocating for Inuit rights to seal and sealskin products as well as the Inuit right to be involved in issues related to Arctic waters. Aaju received the Order of Canada on December
30, 2011.

Read More… Read Less…

Steve Wood

My Nehiyaw name is “Mistikwâskihk Napesis” (Drum Boy). My colonial name is Steve Wood and I hail from the Saddle…

My Nehiyaw name is “Mistikwâskihk Napesis” (Drum Boy). My colonial name is Steve Wood and I hail from the Saddle Lake Cree Band #125, located in what today is known as Alberta, Canada. I am a residential school survivor. Married to my wife Hilda Omeasoo-Wood for 38 years with 3 children and 9 grandchildren. I am currently the Vice-Principal at the Ermineskin Jr./Sr. High under the Maskwacis Education Schools Commission. I am also the founder and leader of multi-Grammy/Juno nominee and winner respectively, Northern Cree. I completed my education degree at the University of Alberta located in Edmonton, AB. My motto is:

“If you believe in yourself, who you are, where you come from, your culture, and more importantly your language, it will take you to places you never even dreamed of.”

Read More… Read Less…

Julie Desrochers

Taansihi, bonjour, hello, Julie Desrochers dishinikaashoon. I am a Francophone, Métis woman from Winnipeg, Manitoba. I am a sister, daughter,…

Taansihi, bonjour, hello, Julie Desrochers dishinikaashoon.
I am a Francophone, Métis woman from Winnipeg, Manitoba. I am a sister, daughter,
friend, educator, beadwork artist and small business owner and partner of Prairie Owl Beads. My journey with beadwork started 15 years ago in a full day workshop led by
Métis artist Gregory Scofield. Beadwork has since become an important part of my life,
a reminder of who I am, where I come from and the passion and pride of my ancestors who came before me. As I have refined my skills, I am now fortunate to share my beadwork and teach this skill to people throughout Turtle Island. Whether big or small, every project and every class I teach, to beaders or beginners, comes new connections,
new tricks and new history. I am thankful to all the mentors and elders who have
accompanied me on this journey, for the teachings they have shared and the techniques I have learned. One of the most important lessons learned as I continue to bead is its importance, how it is healing, it is an act of resistance and an intrinsic part of the Métis identity. As a proud Métis woman and teacher, I believe in the importance of sharing
the art of beadwork so that it can continue to represent the creativity, strength, and
resilience of our nation.

Read More… Read Less…

Ivan Flett Memorial Dancers

Ivan Flett Memorial Dancers are three siblings from Winnipeg, Manitoba who share a passion for dance, not just any dance…

Ivan Flett Memorial Dancers are three siblings from Winnipeg, Manitoba who share a passion for dance, not just any dance it’s all about the Red River Jig!

Michael, Jacob and Cieanna Harris began dancing at the young age of five years old. Michael being the oldest started performing his own solo shows, Jacob followed his brother footprints and they became a duo show, Cieanna enjoyed watching her brothers perform, she learned and they became a trio group and they have been inseparable since then.

They perform traditional dances of the Red River Jig mixed with modern dancing known as the hip hop jig. Through their gift of dance they have had great opportunities to travel the world and they hold numerous achievements and awards.

Their main focus is to attract youth through the rhythm and style of the hip hop jig. They hope to motivate and inspire people of all ages, and bring awareness that their culture is going strong and continues to be ambitious with this dance and music.

Formally known as the Slick and Lil J Show, back in 2012 they lost one of their biggest fans and proud supporter, Grandpa Ivan Flett passed away, it was with great sadness but an honour to rename themselves the Ivan Flett Memorial Dancers. Every dance they do is in honour of him.

Their show wouldn’t be complete without the outfits and they give a huge thank you to their Grandma Dawn Harris-Flett who designs and custom makes all their attire. Thanks to Designs by Dawn!

IFMD would also like to thank all of their fans and family for their continued love and support.

Read More… Read Less…

Rachelle Poems George KWALTANAAT (ancestral name)

Rachelle started performing as a child in her family’s dance group “Children Of Takaya” started by her Great Grandfather Chief…

Rachelle started performing as a child in her family’s dance group “Children Of Takaya” started by her Great Grandfather Chief Dan George. As a teen Rachelle attended New Image College of Fine Arts, there she received her Performing Arts Diploma. Right after, Rachelle signed on with one of the top acting agencies in North America. She worked with her cousin Columpa Bobb at the FireHall Arts Theatre. Also auditioned for Film & Television, and was the lead on many independent films. She graduated from the two-year Indigenous Digital Filmmaking program at Capilano University. Also Rachelle went to Burbank California and got certified in RED Camera Operating. Rachelle’s short script dedicated to MMIW was one of 6 scripts selected across Canada for the Whistler Film Fest Indigenous Fellowship. Currently, she is a part of a Writing Internship with her Auntie Lee Maracle. That also gained her a Wild Bird Trust Artist Residency.

Read More… Read Less…

Ryan Cooper

Ryan Cooper is an Ojibwe, two spirited, LGBTQ+ Producer from Treaty One Territory Peguis First Nation. Ryan is a graduate…

Ryan Cooper is an Ojibwe, two spirited, LGBTQ+ Producer from Treaty One Territory Peguis First Nation. Ryan is a graduate of the National Screen Institute’s CBC New Indigenous Voices program, The NSI Indigidocs program where he had the opportunity to produce an award-winning short documentary that went on to be programmed in festivals all around the globe. 

 

Ryan is the creator of two web series, one titled Daybreak People that was programmed on Bell MTS Fibe TV1 channel in 2019 and the ImagineNative/APTN pitch winning series iNdigiThreads. Ryan is producing two TELEFILM TALENT TO WATCH one of which is INdigiThreads and Alter Boys. Alter Boys is also a part of the CFC Netflix series accelerator program. Also named as one of Playback’s Ten to Watch for 2021 and was chosen as a participant for The WarnerMedia x Canadian Academy Writers Program cohort of 2021.

 

Ryan is also a part of this year’s Banff World Media Festival & IPF producer Bursary with “My Sassy Sasquatch.” Ryan is the co-owner of Rainy Storm Productions inc. and currently has several projects in development.

Read More… Read Less…

Sonya Ballantyne

Sonya Ballantyne is a filmmaker and writer originally from Misipawistik Cree Nation in Northern Manitoba. Her work focuses on Indigenous…

Sonya Ballantyne is a filmmaker and writer originally from Misipawistik Cree Nation in Northern Manitoba. Her work focuses on Indigenous women and girls in non-traditional film genres such as horror, sci-fi, and fantasy. Her first film Crash Site has played in festivals internationally and she hopes to direct a Superman film in the future.

Read More… Read Less…

Adeline Bird

Adeline Bird is an Afro-Anishnabe author, filmmaker, and producer. She grew up in Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada, but is a proud…

Adeline Bird is an Afro-Anishnabe author, filmmaker, and producer. She grew up in Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada, but is a proud member of Treaty #4 Rolling River First Nations. Adeline currently works as a writer and freelance producer. She has produced segments for daytime television hit shows such as CTV’s The Social & Etalk. Adeline is a graduate of the National Screen Institute’s CBC New Indigenous Voices program, where she made her directorial debut with the short film Nappy Hair and Eagle Feather, now featured on CBC Gem. Adeline was one of the 2018 ImagiNative-APTN pitch winners, with her web series entitled iNdigiThreads (in pre- development), and part of the 2019 cohort of Telefilm Canada’s Talent To Watch. Her first book, Be Unapologetically You: A Self- Love Guide for Women of Color, is available on Amazon.com, Wal-mart, and Barnes & Noble. Adeline currently sits in the Visioning Committee of BIPOC TV & Film, and is a regular speaker for various organizations, as an advocate and thought leader on the ongoing discussions on equity & inclusion in the Canadian media industry. 

Read More… Read Less…

Back to top

Day 3 – Truth and Reconciliation

11:30 AM ET – Welcome and Introduction from the NCTR
Concurrent Sessions follow:
Session (45 Minutes)Speaker
Session 1TBC (French)Wapikoni/Télé-Québec
Session 2TBCTBC
Session 3Mi’kmaq Ancient History Told in Storytelling FashionJulie Pellissier-Lush
Session 4Old Enough to Go, Old Enough to Know- Talking Residential Schools with KidsRebecca Thomas
Session 5Legacy of Hope: Truth and Reconciliation AllyshipTeresa Edwards
Healing Supports are available throughout the sessions

Back to top

1:00 PM ET Concurrent Sessions
Session (45 Minutes)Speaker
Session 1TBCJoé Juneau
Session 2The National Arts Centre: Indigenous Performing ArtsKevin Loring
Session 3Speaking Our Truth: A Conversation with the Indigenous children’s writer Monique Gray Smith and TRC Honorary Witness/CBC Journalist Shelagh RogersShelagh Rogers and Monique Gray-Smith
Session 4Keeping Reconciliation Alive: Learning from a Truth and Reconciliation CommissionerDr. Marie Wilson (honoris causa)
Session 5Carrying On the Tradition- Inuit Games/Arctic SportsKyle Kaayák’w Worl
Healing Supports are available throughout the sessions

Back to top

Rebecca Thomas

Rebecca Thomas is an award winning Mi’kmaw poet and activist who does not want to be a poet or activist.…

Rebecca Thomas is an award winning Mi’kmaw poet and activist who does not want to be a poet or activist. She just happens to be good enough at poetry and persuasion to get people to listen but her ultimate goal is to make Canada a better place for her Indigenous community because so many people tend to forget they were here first. She has accidentally found herself as the former Poet Laureate of Halifax. She has performed with a Tribe Called Red and has spoken and lectured at conferences and coffee houses from coast to coast. She writes kids books about growing up the child of a residential school Survivor. She has written for the CBC, Washington Post, and Bon Appetite Magazine but has yet to make a chapbook. She collaborated with composer Laura Sgroi to bring together a three poem story and full orchestral score which had its debut with the Kitchener Waterloo symphony in the spring of 2019. Her first book I’m Finding My Talk has been shortlisted for the First Nations Community Reads Award. Her most recent collection of poetry called “I place you into the fire” was listed as one of CBC’s top 20 books of 2020. Her book “Swift Fox All Along” was a finalist for the 2020 Governor General’s Award for children’s literature. She pays her bills by helping students who are overwhelmed with life and studies as a Student Services Advisor at the Nova Scotia Community College. She also feels real uncomfortable writing bios about herself. She’s done some other things here and there but has reached her tolerance for hearing her accomplishments listed off.

Read More… Read Less…

Kyle Kaayák’w Worl

Kyle Kaayák’w Worl is an award winning Arctic Sports athlete and coach currently residing in Juneau, Alaska. He is Tlingit…

Kyle Kaayák’w Worl is an award winning Arctic Sports athlete and coach
currently residing in Juneau, Alaska. He is Tlingit of the Lukaax̲.ádi clan,
Deg Hit’an and Yup’ik. Over his 12 year career in the sport he has won over
80 medals, traveling from Alaska to Greenland to compete in various
events. Along with training and coaching year round in Alaska, Kyle travels
across the world to demonstrate Arctic Sports, including the Riddu Riddu
Festival in Northern Norway, Orenda Art International Gallery in Paris, and
Smithsonian National Museum of the American Indian in Washington, D.C.

Read More… Read Less…

Julie Pellissier-Lush

Julie Pellissier-Lush is an actress, and bestselling author of My Mi’kmaq Mother, and Mi’kmaq Campfire Stories of Prince Edward Island. …

Julie Pellissier-Lush is an actress, and bestselling author of My Mi’kmaq Mother, and Mi’kmaq Campfire Stories of Prince Edward Island.  She is the Poet Laureate for PEI, recipient of the Queens jubilee medal in 2013, the Meritorious Service Medal recipient in 2017, and the Senators 150 medal in April 2019. She grew up all over Eastern Canada and spent several years in Winnipeg, Manitoba, before coming back home. Julie is a graduate from the University of Winnipeg in 2000 with a double major in Psychology and Human Resource Management. She works as a Knowledge Keeper for L’nuey, the Epekwitk Mi’kmaq-rights initiative and the Board of Director for the Native Council of PEI.  She writes, acts, and does photography to preserve the history and culture of the Mi’kmaq for future generations. Julie wrote the poems for the play Mi’kmaq Legends which has been performed on many different stages in the Atlantic region. Julie lives in PEI with her husband Rick, her five children, and her granddaughter Miah.

Read More… Read Less…

Monique Gray Smith

Monique Gray Smith is an award-winning, and best-selling author of books for children and youth, as well as adults. Her…

Monique Gray Smith is an award-winning, and best-selling author of books for children and youth, as well as adults. Her children’s books include; My Heart Fills With Happiness, You Hold Me Up, When We Are Kind. Her YA/Adult books include; Speaking our Truth: A Journey of Reconciliation, Tilly: A Story of Hope and Resilience, Tilly and the Crazy Eights and Lucy and Lola. She is a proud mom of teenage twins, and is of Cree, Lakota and Scottish ancestry. Monique is well known for her storytelling, spirit of generosity and belief that love is medicine. She and her family are blessed to live on the traditional territory of the Lekwungen and WSÁNEĆ people, also known as Victoria, Canada.

Read More… Read Less…

Dr. Marie Wilson (honoris causa)

Marie Wilson served as one of three Commissioners of the historic Truth and Reconciliation Commission (TRC 2009-2015), leading to an…

Marie Wilson served as one of three Commissioners of the historic Truth and Reconciliation Commission (TRC 2009-2015), leading to an unprecedented oral and written record of the facts and impacts of more than a century of forced residential schooling for Indigenous children in Canada.  A prominent public speaker throughout Canada and internationally, she brings acknowledged expertise on the successes and challenges of advancing reconciliation.

Fluently bilingual in French and English, Ms. Wilson has lengthy accomplishments in related professions, as an award-winning journalist and program trainer, federal and territorial executive manager, high school teacher in Africa, university lecturer, and consultant.

She has served as 2016 Professor of Practice at McGill University’s Institute for the Study of International Development, a Mentor for the Pierre Elliot Trudeau Foundation and Board Director for the Rideau Hall Foundation and the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation (CBC-Radio-Canada).

Ms. Wilson has received honorary degrees from several Canadian universities, the Order of the Northwest Territories, the Order of Canada, and the Meritorious Service Cross.

She and her husband, Stephen Kakfwi, have three children and four grandchildren…her most valuable achievements!

 

Read More… Read Less…

Shelagh Rogers

Shelagh Rogers is a veteran broadcast-journalist at the CBC, currently the host and a producer of The Next Chapter, a…

Shelagh Rogers is a veteran broadcast-journalist at the CBC, currently the host and a producer of The Next Chapter, a radio program devoted to writing in Canada.

In 2011, she was inducted as an Honorary Witness for the Truth and Reconciliation Commission. She committed to sharing the truth of Survivors and their families so that Canada never forgets its true history. Also in 2011, she was inducted into the Order of Canada as an Officer, for promoting writing in Canada, adult literacy, mental health and truth and reconciliation. She holds eight honorary doctorates. Shelagh is currently Chancellor of the University of Victoria. Shelagh is a member of the Metis Nation of Greater Victoria. She is honoured to be talking with Monique Gray Smith from the unceded territory of the Snuneymuxw First Nation where she lives as a grateful visitor.

Read More… Read Less…

Teresa Edwards

Teresa Edwards is a member of the Listuguj Mi’gmaq First Nation in Quebec. Her ceremonial name is Young Fire Woman,…

Teresa Edwards is a member of the Listuguj Mi’gmaq First Nation in Quebec. Her ceremonial name is Young Fire Woman, a name that she strives to fulfill through her work as an International Human Rights Lawyer. Teresa is a mother to three amazing souls – Ashley, Dakota, and Derek, and the grandmother (Giju) to Alivia and Avery, who all inspire her to work towards bringing equity to Indigenous Peoples by improving socio-economic conditions and their overall well-being. For over 30 years, she has been a strong advocate for Indigenous Peoples by championing changes in programs, policy, and legislation from within government and while working with National Indigenous Organizations such as the Assembly of First Nations, Native Women’s Association of Canada, and from within her own legal practice.

Teresa has been the Executive Director and In-House Legal Counsel for the Legacy of Hope Foundation (LHF) for 4 1/2 years. The LHF is a national Indigenous-led charitable organization founded in 2000 to educate and raise awareness about the history and existing intergenerational impacts from the Residential and Day School System, Sixties Scoop, and links to the impacts facing Indigenous Peoples today.

Please join us to hear our Guest Speaker: Teresa Edwards, (Young Fire Woman), who is the Executive Director and In-House Legal Counsel of the Legacy of Hope Foundation. She will speak about Residential and Day Schools, the Sixties Scoop, and other colonial acts of oppression, and how they continue to impact Indigenous Peoples today. Teresa will also discuss how to take action to be an ally and what can be done to foster Reconciliation in Canada.

Read More… Read Less…

Day 4 – Orange Shirt Day

11:30 AM ET – Welcome and Introduction from the NCTR
Concurrent Sessions follow:
Session (45 Minutes)Speaker
Session 1TBC (French)Wapikoni/Télé-Québec
Session 2What does it Mean to Wear an Orange ShirtTheland Kicknosway
Session 3Witness BlanketCarey Newman
Session 4Beyond Orange Shirt DayPhyllis Webstad
Session 5Saving the Spirit- the Heroism of Margaret Olemaun Pokiak- Fenton of Fatty Legs
(Literature)
Christy Jordan-Fenton
Healing Supports are available throughout the sessions

Back to top

1:00 PM ET Concurrent Sessions
Session (45 Minutes)Speaker
Session 1Survivor Dialogues (French)Richard Kistabish
Session 2Survivor Dialogues, NWTNorman Yakelaya
Session 3Being William (French)
(VR Experience)
Jason Brennan
Session 4Survivor Dialogues – Inuk WomenMaata Evaluardjuk-Palmer,
Edna Elias,
the Honourable Levinia Brown
Session 5Survivor Dialogues – OntarioLila Bruyere
Healing Supports are available throughout the sessions

Back to top

Christy Jordan-Fenton

Christy Jordan-Fenton is the author of four award winning children’s books, to include the bestselling Fatty Legs, about her late…

Christy Jordan-Fenton is the author of four award winning children’s books, to include the bestselling Fatty Legs, about her late Inuvialuk mother and best friend, Olemaun Margaret Pokiak-Fenton, who attended an Arctic residential school in the 1940s. Prior to 2020 she and Margaret travelled internationally giving more than 100 presentations a year, highlighting the strength and courage of Indigenous children who were forced to be their own heroes at the horrific government boarding schools. Margaret passed in April of 2020, but Christy continues to share Margaret’s story, with her blessing. Christy currently works as a curriculum designer and facilitator of capacity building programs with northern Indigenous nations and is a co-director of the Cultural Learning and Innovation Circle. She is also a member of the Yellow Thunder ceremonial family of the Kainai Blackfoot.

Read More… Read Less…

Jason Brennan

Jason Brennan is the president of Nish Media and a proud band member of the Kitigan Zibi Anishinabeg community. In…

Jason Brennan is the president of Nish Media and a proud band member of the Kitigan Zibi Anishinabeg community. In 15 years, Nish has produced shows for APTN, CBC, Radio-Canada, Ici ArtV, Canal D, PBS, TV5, RDI and CBC Docs.  

In 2015, the company released its first feature film in Quebec theatres. “LE DEP”, written and directed by Sonia Bonspille Boileau, was selected in some of the world’s top film festivals such as the Karlovy Vary Film Festival, the Vancouver Film Festival, the Raindance Film Festival, ImagineNative and the American Indian Film Festival. Bonspille Boileau’s second feature film, Rustic Oracle, released in late 2019 in the midst of the pandemic, still received a national release on more than 40 screens in three major cities, Montreal, Toronto and Vancouver.

In 2019, Nish Media secured funding for its third feature film, “L’Inhumain” which will feature well-known Quebec artist Samian in the lead role. This time, Jason Brennan helmed the film as director in the horror themed Wendigo story scheduled to be released in 2022.

All of those efforts led the company to a recent agreement with Radio-Canada that will allow Nish Media to produce the first ever Indigenous French drama series on a major Canadian network.

Read More… Read Less…

Lila Bruyere

My name is Lila B. and I currently reside in Sarnia, Ontario. I am currently a member of the National Survivors…

My name is Lila B. and I currently reside in Sarnia, Ontario. I am currently a member of the National Survivors Circle for the Truth & Reconciliation Commission (TRC) in Winnipeg, Manitoba.

I am Ojibway from Couchiching First Nation in Northwestern Ontario. I went to Residential School from the age of 6 – 14 yrs. of age at St. Margarets Residential School in Fort Frances, Ontario. I am the second youngest of twelve, 9 brothers and 2 sisters.

One of the biggest impacts of the residential school system was abandonment, that crippled me and affected relationships.

There is so much that happened in these 32 years, but I couldn’t turn back because I probably would have died. I, do what I must do to maintain my sobriety and that includes talking to my counselor on a regular basis, talk to my sponsor daily and sharing with another alcoholic. My biggest support in the program is my son Shawn, it is nice to have a son in recovery. We talk recovery all the time and we, do our talks about my Residential School experience which includes my sobriety because I used alcohol to deal with my pain.

We, only look back when we need to help another and keep striving for dreams to come true. We will suddenly know that God is doing for us what we could not do ourselves.

Miigwetch {thank you}

Lila

Read More… Read Less…

Theland Kicknosway

Theland Kicknosway is an Indigenous youth who uses his voice to spread his message and showcase Indigenous culture. He is…

Theland Kicknosway is an Indigenous youth who uses his voice to spread his message and showcase Indigenous culture. He is Wolf Clan from the Potawatomi and Cree Nation and is a member of Walpole Island, Bkejwanong Territory.

Theland has been a fixture in the Indigenous community as a traditional singer, drummer, dancer, activist & influencer. In 2018, Theland became the youngest Indspire Laureate named for Culture, Heritage and Spirituality. His path-breaking efforts have also been mentioned in Teen Vogue, Entertainment Tonight, and Complex. In his 18th year in the Physical World, Theland continues to shine.

Read More… Read Less…

Back to top

Day 5 – Knowledge Transfer: Elder and Youth Dialogues

11:30 AM ET – Welcome and Introduction from the NCTR
Concurrent Sessions follow:
Session (45 Minutes)Speaker
Session 1TBC (French)Wapikoni/Télé-Québec
Session 2Reconciliation as Conveyed in Indigenous LanguagesImelda (Opolahsomuwehs) Perley
Session 3TBCMitch Case
Session 4Two Eyed Seeing, a Mi’kmaw perspectiveAlbert Marshall
Session 5Youth Advocacy and EmpowermentAFN Youth Council
Healing Supports are available throughout the sessions

Back to top

1:00 PM ET Concurrent Sessions
Session (45 Minutes)Speaker
Session 1TBC (French)TBC
Session 2Language and Culture Go Hand and HandPaul Sam
(Telaxten)
Session 3Inuit Stories: Art and LifeSally Kate Qimmiunaaq Webster, Inuk (Ottawa, Ontario)
Session 4Mi’kmaw Creation StoryStephen Augustine, Unama’ki College
Session 5TBCFormer National Chief Phil Fontaine and Dale Sturges (RBC)
Healing Supports are available throughout the sessions

Back to top

Albert Marshall

Albert Marshall, Elder, LLD is from the Moose Clan of the Mi’kmaw Nation. He was married to the late Murdena…

Albert Marshall, Elder, LLD is from the Moose Clan of the Mi’kmaw Nation. He was married to the late Murdena Marshall and together they lived in Eskasoni First Nation in Unama’ki-Cape Breton, Nova Scotia; they have six children, 14 grandchildren, and five great-grandchildren. Albert and Murdena have long been passionate advocates for the preservation, promotion, and revitalization of Mi’kmaw Traditional Knowledge, including language, spirituality, stories, practices, and ways of knowing. In 2009, Albert and Murdena were awarded Honorary Doctorates in recognition of their devotion and commitment to this work. Their energy, wisdom, and knowledge helped create the innovative Integrative Science academic program at Cape Breton University in the 1990s. Together, Albert and Murdena have developed KECCA (Knowledge Education & Culture Consultant Associates) to better enable their work and to encourage a strong future for the Mi’kmaw Nation and its peoples. Albert is a passionate advocate of cross- cultural understandings and healing and of our human responsibilities to care for all creatures and our Earth Mother. He a fluent speaker of Mi’kmaw and the “designated voice” for the Mi’kmaw Elders of Unama’ki with respect to environmental issues. Albert sits on various committees and boards that guide initiatives in natural resource management, Aboriginal health research and education, or that serve First Nations’ governance issues or that otherwise work towards ethical environmental, social and economic practices. For example, he is a member of the Advisory Council for Unama’ki College of Cape Breton University, the Steering Committee for the Collaborative Environmental Planning Initiative (CEPI) for the Bras d’Or Lake, and the Advisory Board for the National Collaborating Centre for Aboriginal Health headquartered at the University of Northern British Columbia. Albert also served for several years on the board for the Bras d’Or Lake Biosphere Reserve Association, the group that successfully obtained UNESCO designation for the biosphere. He is the person who coined the phrase Two-Eyed Seeing / Etuaptmumk as a guiding principle for collaborative work which encourages learning to see from one eye with the strengths of Indigenous knowledges and ways of knowing, and from the other eye with the strengths of Western knowledges and ways of knowing … and learning to use both these eyes together, for the benefit of all. In 2009, Albert was awarded the Marshall Award for Aboriginal Leadership as part of the Eco-Hero Awards delivered by the NS Environmental Network (an umbrella organization of provincial environmental and health organizations). Albert was born in Eskasoni, NS. As a young boy, he was taken away from his family and spent many years as an inmate of the Shubenacadie Indian Residential School on the mainland of Nova Scotia. Albert was profoundly affected by this experience but today seldom talks about those many painful and traumatic years. Rather, the experience has led him on a lifelong quest to connect with and understand both the culture he was removed from, and the culture he was forced into … and to help these cultures find ways to live in mutual respect of each other’s strengths and ways.

Read More… Read Less…

Stephen Augustine

Stephen Augustine is a Hereditary Chief on the Mi’kmaq Grand Council and the Associate Vice-President Indigenous Affairs and Unama’ki College…

Stephen Augustine is a Hereditary Chief on the Mi’kmaq Grand Council and the Associate Vice-President Indigenous Affairs and Unama’ki College at Cape Breton University. Previously (1996-2013) he was the Curator of Ethnology for Eastern Maritimes, Ethnology Services Division of the Canadian Museum of Civilization, in Gatineau/Ottawa. He holds a Masters degree in Canadian Studies from Carleton University focussing on traditional knowledge curriculum development in the context of the education system and a Bachelor of Arts in Anthropology and Political Science from St. Thomas University.

Over the years, Mr. Augustine has shared his expertise in research and traditional knowledge with many organizations, including government departments, the Assembly of First Nations, and various Aboriginal communities across Canada. He is part of an advisory panel on biodiversity issues and has worked extensively with the United Nations programs on development and the environment. He taught sessional courses in Canadian Studies at Carleton University for ten years (course: Aboriginal Peoples and the Knowledge Economy) and recently has taught in Mi’kmaq Studies (courses: Mi’kmaq Traditional Knowledge, Mi’kmaq Oral History, Mi’kmaq Knowledge Economy, and Learning from the Knowledge Keepers of Mi’kma’ki). He has been invited to speak at both national and international conferences. He has published papers, been recorded for radio and various video programs on traditional knowledge, Maritime history and treaties, and storytelling. He has organized cross-cultural workshops and made presentations to a wide variety of institutions (U.N., federal and provincial departments, universities, museums, UNESCO and The Vatican). His book on the CMC collections (Mi’kmaq & Maliseet Cultural Ancestral Material, Mercury Series, CMC, 2005) has proven a valuable resource for academic researchers and educators alike.

He has been accredited as an expert witness in various court cases, involving Aboriginal access to resources in the Maritimes, being recognized for his knowledge both of oral history and ethno-history, and of the treaties in the region. He has recently been named the recipient of the 2009 National Aboriginal Achievement Award for Culture, Heritage and Spirituality and the 2009 New Brunswick Lieutenant-Governor’s Dialogue Award. He has also been named (fall 2008) member of the Sectoral Commission for Culture, Communication and Information for the Canadian Commission for UNESCO. He has been Elder Advisor to the Federal Court of Canada Judges, the Truth and Reconciliation Commission and the Human Rights Commission of Canada. In his role as a hereditary Chief on the Mi’kmaq Grand Council and by Elders’ training since an early age, Stephen J. Augustine has a thorough command of traditional practices, his language and the history of his people.

Read More… Read Less…

Imelda (Opolahsomuwehs) Perley

Dr. Perley is a member of St. Mary’s First Nation who is currently the Elder-in-Residence at Chief Harold Sappier Memorial…

Dr. Perley is a member of St. Mary’s First Nation who is currently the Elder-in-Residence at Chief Harold Sappier Memorial Elementary School.  She is also a part-time instructor at UNB teaching Wolastoqey Language and Wabanaki Worldviews courses. Imelda is retired from her position as Elder-In-Residence for the University of New Brunswick. She continues her role as cultural advisor for community organizations, provincial and federal agencies. She is a Cultural Consultant for two Health Canada initiatives titled “Oluwikoneyak Weckuwapasihtit (From the Womb to Beyond) within the Maternal Child Health program and “’Ciw Wolakomiksuwakon” (For Healthy Mind, Body and Spirit) within the Maliseet Nation Mental Wellness program. Her traditional roles within the community include Sweatlodge Keeper, Medicine Wheel Teacher, Sacred Pipe Carrier, and Keeper of the Women’s Ceremonies.

To date, Imelda has been acknowledged for her language and cultural contributions through many awards, certificates and medals.  In 2012, Imelda received the Queen Jubilee Medal for community service. She was also awarded the 2017 Governor Generals Sovereign Medal for Volunteers for delivering language and cultural activities. In 2017, Imelda was one of Canada’s 150 Ambassadors and continues to share with Canada her language through language teaching tweets at askomiw150.  Maine State Legislative Assembly also recognized her dedication to language revitalization efforts within both university and community programs.  In May of 2019, Imelda received an honorary doctorate of letters degree from University of New Brunswick for her “incredible work contributing to the support, education and visibility of Indigenous peoples at UNB and across the province”.

Read More… Read Less…

Phil Fontaine

Mr. Phil Fontaine is the owner of Ishkonigan Inc., a company specializing in Indigenous engagement, consultation and negotiation. Mr. Fontaine…

Mr. Phil Fontaine is the owner of Ishkonigan Inc., a company specializing in Indigenous engagement, consultation and negotiation. Mr. Fontaine is also the Special Advisor of the Royal Bank of Canada.  Mr. Fontaine served as National Chief of the Assembly of First Nations for an unprecedented three terms.  He is a Member of Order of Manitoba and has received a National Aboriginal Achievement Award, the Equitas Human Rights Education Award, the Distinguished Leadership Award from the University of Ottawa, the Queen’s Diamond Jubilee, and most recently was appointed to the Order of Canada. Mr. Fontaine also holds eighteen Honorary Doctorates from Canada and the United States.

Read More… Read Less…

Mitch Case

Mitch Case is a proud Métis citizen from the Historic Sault Ste. Marie Métis Community. Mitch is a community based…

Mitch Case is a proud Métis citizen from the Historic Sault Ste. Marie Métis Community. Mitch is a community based historian, focusing on the history of Ontario Métis communities; especially those around the Great Lakes.

In June of 2020, Mitch was elected to serve as the Region 4 Councillor on the Provisional Council of the Métis Nation of Ontario. Mitch was elected on a platform of advancing Métis Self-Government, improving communication, advancing Métis culture, and most importantly advancing the historic claims of Métis community in the Sault Ste Marie, Superior East, Huron North Shore area.

Mitch has served as a Youth Representative at the local and regional levels and was elected President of the Métis Nation of Ontario Youth Council (MNOYC) in 2012, and reelected in 2016. As President of the MNOYC, Mitch was a member of the Provisional Council of the Métis Nation of Ontario.

Mitch is passionate defender of the Métis right to self determination, jurisdiction over lands and resources and the cause of Métis Nationalism. Mitch volunteers in schools, colleges and universities across Ontario where he is invited to speak about Métis culture, history, traditions, rights and contemporary issues. Mitch serves on several boards and committees at the local, provincial and national levels. Mitch is a graduate of Algoma University where he studied Anishinaabemowin and History.

For 6 years Mitch worked as Director of Student Services, Outreach and Resources at Shingwauk Kinoomaage Gamig, an Anishinaabe culture based post secondary education institute in Sault Ste Marie. Mitch is a former member of the Premier’s Council on Youth Opportunities which advises the Ontario Premier and 24 Ministries and Agencies on youth policy.

Mitch has been recognized for his dedication and commitment to the Métis Nation on many occasions, including being awarded:

Young Medal for Volunteers

Lt. Gov. David Onley

Sovereign’s Medal for Volunteerism

Lt. Gov. Elizabeth Dowdswell

Alumni Achievement Award

Algoma University

Suzanne Rochon-Burnette Volunteer of the Year Award

Métis Nation of Ontario

Indigenous Professional of the Year Award

Sault Ste. Marie Chamber of Commerce

 

Read More… Read Less…

Sally Kate Qimmiunaaq Webster, Inuk (Ottawa, Ontario)

Sally Kate Qimmiunaaq Webster was born on the land near Baker Lake, Nunavut. In 1956, the Federal Government started a…

Sally Kate Qimmiunaaq Webster was born on the land near Baker Lake, Nunavut. In 1956, the Federal Government started a school in Baker Lake and at the age of 11 Sally began attending school. 

At age 16, Sally started her career as a Classroom Assistant in Baker Lake. One of her many duties was to act as a liaison between the teacher and the parents.

Sally later worked as the Ladies Group Coordinator for Arctic College, Baker Lake Campus and at Pauktuutit Inuit Women’s Association in Ottawa. Sally is also an entrepreneur having operated the Baker Lake Fine Arts and Crafts where she coordinated and promoted the fine art of the women of Baker Lake. As an Elder she is often consulted for her expertise on Inuit art and culture. Sally currently lives in Ottawa and is married with five children and seven grandchildren.

Read More… Read Less…

Back to top

Sign Up for Our Newsletter

Sign up today to stay informed and get regular updates about NCTR.

NCTR’s spirit name – bezhig miigwan, meaning “one feather”.

Bezhig miigwan calls upon us to see each Survivor coming to the NCTR as a single eagle feather and to show those Survivors the same respect and attention an eagle feather deserves. It also teaches we are all in this together — we are all one, connected, and it is vital to work together to achieve reconciliation.